Saturday, August 29, 2009

My Horizontal Life by Chelsea Handler - A Book Discussion

After reading My Horizontal Life by Chelsea Handler, what was your overall impression of the book? What did you find surprising about the facts introduced in this book? How has reading this book changed your opinion of Chelsea Handler or one-night stands, if it has at all? In your opinion, does Chelsea present information in a way that is interesting and insightful, and if so, how does she achieve this? What do you think her parents think of this book? Would you recommend this book to your friends, why or why not?

Friday, August 28, 2009

A Spell for Chameleon by Piers Anthony -- A Recommendation

Xanth was the enchanted land where magic ruled--where every citizen had a special spell only he could cast. That is, except for Bink of North Village. He was sure he possessed no magic, and knew that if he didn't find some soon, he would be exiled. According to the Good Magician Humpfrey, the charts said that Bink was as powerful as the King or even the Evil Magician Trent. Unfortunately, no one could determine its form. Meanwhile, Bink was in despair. If he didn't find his magic soon, he would be forced to leave....

Thursday, August 27, 2009

President Obama's summer book list

I read an article on http://www.slate.com/ by John Dickerson that discets the meaning behind the titles President Obama is reading this summer. I know, too much time on their hands! Still, I found it interesting. :) Here is the list, but for the discussion on what each titles says about him you have to read the article, cited here.

The Way Home by George Pelecanos, a crime thriller based in Washington, D.C.;

Lush Life by Richard Price, a story of race and class set in New York's Lower East Side;

• Tom Friedman's Hot, Flat, and Crowded, on the benefits to America of an environmental revolution;

John Adams by David McCullough;

Plainsong by Kent Haruf, a drama about the life of eight different characters living in a Colorado prairie community.


I don't know about you, but The Way Home sounds pretty interesting! :)

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

The Pact by Jodi Picoult -- A Recommendation

In this contemporary tale of love and friendship, Jodi Picoult brings to life a familiar world, and in a single terrifying moment awakens every parent's worse fear: We think we know our children… but do we ever really know them at all?

For eighteen years the Hartes and the Golds have lived next door to each other, sharing everything from Chinese food to chicken pox to carpool duty-- they've grown so close it seems they have always been a part of each other's lives. Parents and children alike have been best friends, so it's no surprise that in high school Chris and Emily's friendship blossoms into something more. They've been soul mates since they were born.

So when midnight calls from the hospital come in, no one is ready for the appalling truth: Emily is dead at seventeen from a gunshot wound to the head. There's a single unspent bullet in the gun that Chris took from his father's cabinet-- a bullet that Chris tells police he intended for himself. But a local detective has doubts about the suicide pact that Chris has described.
The profound questions faced by the characters in this heart-rending novel are those we can all relate to: How well do we ever really know our children, our friends? What if…? As its chapters unfold, alternating between an idyllic past and an unthinkable present, The Pact paints an indelible portrait of families in anguish… culminating in an astonishingly suspenseful courtroom drama as Chris finds himself on trial for murder.

With this riveting psychological drama, Jodi Picoult explores the dynamics of intimate relationships under stress-- from the seemingly inexplicable mind of a teenager to the bonds of friendship and marriage. Few writers have such a gift for evoking everyday life coupled with the ability to create a level of dramatic tension that will keep you up reading late into the night. The Pact is storytelling at its best: wonderfully observed, deeply moving, and utterly impossible to put down.

http://www.jodipicoult.com/the-pact.html

Monday, August 24, 2009

Stardust by Neil Gaiman -- A Book Review

Life moves at a leisurely pace in the tiny town of Wall - named after the imposing stone barrier which separates the town from a grassy meadow. Here, young Tristran Thorn has lost his heart to the beautiful Victoria Forester and for the coveted prize of her hand, Tristran vows to retrieve a fallen star and deliver it to his beloved. It is an oath that sends him over the ancient wall and into a world that is dangerous and strange beyond imagining...

Friday, August 21, 2009

What Mother's Do: Especially When it Looks like Nothing by Naomi Stadlen -- A Recommendation

Have you ever spent all day looking after your baby or young child - and ended up feeling that you have 'done nothing all day'? Do you sometimes find it hard to feel pleased with what you are doing, and tell yourself you should achieve more with your time? Maybe it's because you can't see how much you are doing already. In this unique and perceptive look at mothering, Naomi Stadlen draws on many years' work with hundreds of other mothers of a wide variety of ages and backgrounds. She explores mothers' experiences to reveal what they - and you - are doing when it may look, to everyone else, like nothing. If you are a mother, and have ever felt: that nobody understands what you do all day; overwhelmed by your feelings for your baby; tired all the time; that nothing prepared you for motherhood; uncertain what your baby seems to want; short-tempered with your partner - you will find this the most reassuring book you have ever picked up.

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Reader's Choice September

Nine-year-old Oskar Schell is an inventor, amateur entomologist, Francophile, letter writer, pacifist, natural historian, percussionist, romantic, Great Explorer, jeweller, detective, vegan, and collector of butterflies. When his father is killed in the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Centre, Oskar sets out to solve the mystery of a key he disovers in his father's closet. It is a search which leads him into the lives of strangers, through the five boroughs of New York, into history, to the bombings of Dresden and Hiroshima, and on an inward journey which brings him ever closer to some kind of peace.


Drawn by family. Driven by fear. Haunted by fate. Would knowing the future be a gift or a burden? Or even a curse!? The Whitney women of Salem, Massachusetts are renowned for reading the future in the patterns of lace. But the future doesn't always bring good news -- as Towner Whitney knows all too well. When she was just fifteen her gift sent her whole world crashing to pieces. She predicted -- and then witnessed -- something so horrific that she vowed never to read lace again, and fled her home and family for good. Salem is a place of ghosts for Towner, and she swore she would never return. Yet family is a powerful tie and fifteen years later, Towner finds herself back in Salem. Her beloved great-aunt Eva has suddenly disappeared -- and when you've lived a life like Eva's, that could mean real trouble. But Salem is wreathed in sickly shadows and whispered half-memories. It's fast becoming clear that the ghosts of Towner's fractured past have not been brought fully into the light. And with them comes the threat of terrifying new disaster.

Olive Kitteridge might be described by some as a battle axe or as brilliantly pushy, by others as the kindest person they had ever met. Olive herself has always been certain that she is 100% correct about everything - although, lately, her certitude has been shaken. This indomitable character appears at the centre of these narratives that comprise Olive Kitteridge. In each of them, we watch Olive, a retired schoolteacher, as she struggles to make sense of the changes in her life and the lives of those around her - always with brutal honesty, if sometimes painfully. Olive will make you laugh, nod in recognition, as well as wince in pain or shed a tear or two. We meet her stoic husband, bound to her in a marriage both broken and strong, and her own son, tyrannised by Olive's overbearing sensitivities.


HERE IS A SMALL FACT - YOU ARE GOING TO DIE. 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier. Liesel, a nine-year-old girl, is living with a foster family on Himmel Street. Her parents have been taken away to a concentration camp. Liesel steals books. This is her story and the story of the inhabitants of her street when the bombs begin to fall. SOME IMPORTANT INFORMATION - THIS NOVEL IS NARRATED BY DEATH. It's a small story, about: a girl, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. ANOTHER THING YOU SHOULD KNOW - DEATH WILL VISIT THE BOOK THIEF THREE TIMES

Thursday, August 13, 2009

Any Suggestions???


Does anyone have any suggestions for September's Book of the Month?

Please leave us any suggestions you have in the comment area!!

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

Eesoo by Kathleen Boettcher -- A Recommendation by Melanie

A blue-eyed red-haired lady doctor from Iowa is forced into an arranged marriage with a handsome, defiant, alien warrior and an intergalactic adventure begins. Sparks fly between them, humorous situations abound as the action moves through a web of intrigue from Iowa into outer space and concludes on the planet N’dar. Laugh and cry through a suspenseful mystery that will warm your heart and satisfy your thirst for adventure.

Science fiction novel which blends adventure, romance, humor, and mystery. The first in a series of eight. Each novel is a complete story with continuing characters.

Kathleen Boettcher grew up in Waukesha, Wisconsin. Deciding small town living was not exciting enough, she began raising, training, and showing siberian huskies. That led to nationwide travel, dogsledding and intermingling with adventurous people. Horses were added to her life and after routine household duties were complete, racing through the woods on a dogsled or galloping across fields on horseback added joy and adventure. After a move to California curtailed daily excitement, she turned inward for adventure and began writing.

The Time Traveler's Wife in theatres August 14th!!!

Visit the Offical Movie site for everything about the movie including downloadable wallpapers, video, photos....basically the who what when where of the movie!!!


The Official movie site: http://www.thetimetravelerswifemovie.com/

or

Youtube Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USUDlMBR-dQ

Monday, August 3, 2009

Olivia by Ian Falconer -- A Recommendation by Alexa

Happy 3rd Birthday Alexa!!!Have fun with Olivia...
dressing up
singing songs
building sand castles
napping (maybe)
dancing
painting on walls
and -- whew! --
going to sleep at last.

Saturday, August 1, 2009

August's Book Selection

The Winner of our Reader's Choice PollMany people feel like a one-night stand is something to be ashamed or embarrassed of. I disagree...' We've all (well not quite all, perhaps) had at least one: a one-night stand. Often embarrassing and uncomfortable, occasionally outlandish, but most times just a necessary and irresistible evil, the one-night-stand is a social rite as old as sex itself and as common as a bar stool. Enter Chelsea Handler. Gorgeous, sharp, and anything but shy, Chelsea loves men...Lots of them. "My Horizontal Life" chronicles Chelsea's romps through the bedrooms of a host of potential suitors, uncovering what can happen in one night of passion between a man and a sometimes very intoxicated woman. From her short fling with a Vegas stripper named Thunder to her even shorter fling with a very short man, she recalls her myriad one-night stands with hilarious honesty. "My Horizontal Life" is a sensationally frank and funny memoir of sexual life, and a gloriously quirky take on why we do the things we do. Whether you have been there yourself or not, its one guilty pleasure you won't be ashamed to talk about in the morning...
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